The purpose of the Society is:

To educate its membership and the public in the most up-to-date horticultural methods of Rose-growing.

To promote the Rose as a symbol of love, peace, beauty and friendship and encourage rose gardening as an enjoyable hobby.

To honor the Rose as the floral emblem of our Country by sharing roses within the community.

To support the American Rose Society in its work as a conservation, preservation and research organization dedicated to roses.

To encourage membership in the American Rose Society as dedicated to rose horticulture and its purpose to aid amateur, expert and hobbyists in growing roses.

Officers

Sue Witwer

President

Bob Brookhart

Vice President

Walter Petroski

Recording Secretary

Daryl Michael, Jr.

Treasurer

Open position

Corresponding Secretary

Teresa Ramsey

Webmaster

Walter Petroski

Newsletter

Bob Brookhart

Photographer

Certified Rosarians

Jim Zimmerman

Englewood, OH

Barbara Zimmerman

Englewood, OH

Dr. Gary Barlow

Fairborn, OH

Wayne Ramsey

Grosse Pointe Woods, Michigan

Sue Witwer

Dayton, OH

Featured Members

As we launch our new website for the Miami Valley Rose Society, it is a great time to introduce you to some of the people in our society of rose lovers. Many of these folks have been the strength, the foundation, and our leadership for many years. The MVRS is very fortunate to have several knowledgeable, accomplished growers, arrangers, educators, judges, and award-winning members. Frequently, these adjectives can be attributed to each person that is presented to you!

As Webmaster, I leave it for the historians to describe the roots of the MVRS, the activities, and its acknowledgments. Below you will find a link to the society’s history, which was edited and mostly compiled by our member, Dr. Gary Barlow.

The Barbara and Jim Zimmerman Story

Our History

This was quite a project! Our undertaking of constructing a history booklet for the Miami Valley Rose Society was fraught with many potential pitfalls. Our sixty-seven year history alone exposes us to issues like dimming memories and the possibility that records of important events were misplaced, or even undocumented at any particular time. Something as relevant as an interesting photograph, without the supporting names of the participants, can be frustrating and deny the true significance of the content or the activity.